Winter Hiatus

Haunt Heads will return with a new podcast episode in January 2018 (either the 14th or the 15th.) New blog posts will be available on January 9.

We’ve got some great stuff coming in the new year. Stay tuned and STAY SPOOKY!

Your Fellow Haunt Head,

Janine

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That’s when the cannibalism started…

At one point in time, people believed that miasma, a poisonous gas let off by sewers or pits, was the cause of many diseases and that the four humors governed the ideas surrounding personal health and well being. There were also cure all’s composed of various familiar substances that might make a sufferer feel well again. In my neck of the woods, people carried small potatoes in their pockets to get rid of warts and put pebbles under their tongues that they’d found on the graves of pious men and women in hopes of curing rheumatism.  Goose fat and scorched linen was used to “cure” many afflictions of the skin ranging from generally dry and itchy to scaly and rough, and stitching bible verses into the linings of children’s coats prevented a wide range of afflictions and created an aura of protection. It sounds batshit crazy, but there are people who still believe that some of the old “cures” used in isolated communities still work and those people still use them. However, something tells me that we’re no longer using ground up mummies to cure anything. It was called corpse medicine and it was absolutely a thing in the 16th and 17th centuries.

This is Humorous

There are four humors: Blood/Sanguine, Phlegm, Yellow Bile, and Black Bile and these four humors (according to Hippocrates) governed a large majority of early “medical” practices. Let’s take a peek at each individually, shall we?

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The four humors and their qualities.

Blood: Blood is found in veins and arteries (seems pretty normal, right?) and can also be referred to as Sanguine (Latin for to deal with blood.) Hippocrates believed that the liver was exclusively in charge of the blood making process within the body and that the amount of blood within a single individual could influence their complexion as well as their personality. Production of blood was linked to spring and summer and, as the seasons got warmer, the increasing heat brought blood to the surface of the skin producing sweat in an effort to cool off (likely why the blood humor is linked to heat and moisture.) If you had an excess of blood, it meant you were Sanguine and your personality would be jovial or charismatic. It could also mean that you were big into day dreaming and sociable toward others. Sanguine personalities often had red complexions, further leading *”physicians” of the time to believe that their evaluation of Sanguine individuals was correct. Bleeding was the general cure for too much of this humor.

*Please note that I’ve put the term “physician” within quotation marks. During this time, anyone could be a physician on a whim. There were “good physicians,” but nobody really had a clue as to the inner workings of the human body. Anyone could wake up one morning and decide to start treating patients. If that doesn’t scare you, I don’t know what will. Moving right along…

Phlegm: You’ve likely become familiar with this humor while hacking up a lung during cold and flu season. Way back when, phlegm was associated with winter and cold weather. Makes sense. While it was cold and damp outside, people had a tendency to get sick and, of course, the phlegm itself was considered the cause of the illness (not a byproduct.) The treatment would be to avoid cold foods and liquids. If you’re sick, you don’t really have that get up and go, which is likely why people who were categorized as Phlegmatic were quiet and sluggish. The brain and lungs were said to produce this humor.

Black Bile: It just doesn’t exist within the human body. It is likely that clotted blood was mistaken for black bile and was categorized as such. It was believed that Black Bile was produced by the gall bladder and diseases of “fear and despondency.” This was later called melancholia (melancholy,) meaning sad. Black bile is associated with the earth and the season of autumn.

Yellow Bile: If you’ve ever gone a while without eating to the point of being physically sick, you’ve likely met this humor. Yellow Bile was associated with aggression and the element of fire. That makes sense because vomiting stomach acid can be very uncomfortable.

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The four temperaments as depicted in an 18th-century woodcut: phlegmatic, choleric, sanguine and melancholic.

When treatments for certain ailments failed to produce a desired result or a cure, new methods of treatment were explored. Here’s where shit gets weird.

Dear Mummy

Now that we’ve familiarized ourselves with the four humors, let’s look a little closer at the practice of corpse medicine. Now, corpse medicine is not about providing medicinal aid to corpses (because that would be silly.) “Here, Uncle Bob, take this cough syrup and bundle up before you catch cold!” I wish I could say that it’s not what it sounds like, but it’s absolutely what it sounds like. This one quacks like a duck…

Just imagine going to see your chosen “physician” to get treated for a severe case of gout. It is likely that you’d be prescribed  a small tincture of powder. That powder would be the ground  up remains of an Egyptian mummy.

Seriously. A mummy. I’m not kidding.

You could mix the powder with water or in alcohol (if you could afford such a luxury) and drink it down or add just enough water to make a paste and rub it on the affected area. People might even bake it into bread or stir it into whatever they were eating.

Mummies were stolen from their tombs, Irish burial sites were raided and, in an effort to provide a “cure” for what ailed ‘ya, some people even created a powder on their own in order to make a fast buck. It was probably just ground up bones and a little dirt, but the placebo effect was good enough for most people.

Eventually, the world of corpse medicine began to expand to other human remains. Let’s be honest, there aren’t that many mummies in the world and there certainly wasn’t enough supply for the demand.  Grave diggers were employed by those willing to pay for corpses that had been recently buried. Now, when you went to see the “doc” for your gout treatment, you were likely prescribed fat from a human body. You’d be told to slather the fat onto the affected area and then wrap it. I wish I was making this up. Even the King himself (King Charles II) embraced corpse medicine as a way to treat what ailed him. Daily, he would take The King’s Drops, a small tincture that he carried on his person at all times consisting of ground human skull muddled into alcohol.

Perhaps the King could afford corpse medicine, but what about the lowly peasants? Basically, they had to fend for themselves. At public executions, the crowds would gather as close to the front as possible on the off chance that they might be hit with a spurt of blood at a beheading and dip handkerchiefs in the blood that pooled onto the scaffold. Just when you thought there was no possible way to make a beheading more gruesome. Some people paid a small amount for a cup of blood that they could then consume (apparently it was better/more effective warm.) For those who preferred to have their blood cooked, a recipe from a Franciscan apothecary in 1679 described how to make it into a marmalade.

Another reason why corpse medicine was so popular was because consuming the remains of another human being was said to be akin to absorbing that persons essence into yourself. If you consumed the blood of a robust young man or of a virginal young woman, that blood was said to have been especially potent.

According to Beth A. Conklin, a cultural and medical anthropologist  at Vanderbilt University who has studied and written about cannibalism in the Americas,

“Even at corpse medicine’s peak, two groups were demonized for related behaviors that were considered savage and cannibalistic. One was Catholics, whom Protestants condemned for their belief in transubstantiation, that is, that the bread and wine taken during Holy Communion were, through God’s power, changed into the body and blood of Christ. The other group was Native Americans; negative stereotypes about them were justified by the suggestion that these groups practiced cannibalism. “It looks like sheer hypocrisy,” says Conklin. People of the time knew that corpse medicine was made from human remains, but through some mental transubstantiation of their own, those consumers refused to see the cannibalistic implications of their own practices.

Conklin finds a distinct difference between European corpse medicine and the New World cannibalism she has studied. “The one thing that we know is that almost all non-Western cannibal practice is deeply social in the sense that the relationship between the eater and the one who is eaten matters. In the European process, this was largely erased and made irrelevant. Human beings were reduced to simple biological matter equivalent to any other kind of commodity medicine.” 

 

I know corpse medicine sounds crazy, but it actually kind of (stay with me here) made sense. In the 16th and 17th centuries, they weren’t even sure how blood was being circulated throughout the body, let alone what all of the organs inside the body were responsible for. Back then, this form of medicinal treatment made sense because the cure was applied to the afflicted body part. Have a headache? Maybe rub some of this on your head. Stomach upset? Drink a bottle of this. Have rough skin? Rub some of this on it. The cure and the affliction went hand in hand and, until we figured out a little more about the complicated machine that is the human body, that was all we had to go on.

According to Leonardo da Vinci, “We preserve our life with the death of others. In a dead thing insensate life remains which, when it is reunited with the stomachs of the living, regains sensitive and intellectual life.”

Seems legit, Leo. Seems legit.

Your Fellow Haunt Head,

Janine

hauntheadscast@gmail.com

Tweet us @hauntheadscast

Facebook: Haunt Heads Podcast

For podcast episodes, visit us HERE or wherever you listen to podcasts. =)

S2 Ep. 4: Burrito Ghosts

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-f6c93-7d93b8

A new intro, but the same old dance from us!

S2 Ep. 4: Burrito Ghosts

Janine explores the practice of Spiritualism and tells the tale of the Stratford Knockings and the Fox Sisters. Mimi again takes us across the pond to the Thirsk Museum in Thirsk, North Yorkshire, UK, for a sit and a cuppa. Whatever you do, don’t sit in Busby’s Chair!

This episode contains turkey talk and traditions, a (potentially) dropped burrito, an entity named “Mr. Splitfoot,” and a little healthy raggin’ on Bagans.

Music/Intro
St. James Infirmary, is generously provided by Fox and Branch and is used with their permission. For more info about them and additional samples of their music, visit their website HERE. You can also purchase digital and physical copies of their CD’s, which is something we’re sure they’d love. =)

Knock, knock, knockin’…

Everyone loves a good ghost story. There’s something about the use of  narrative to relay a spooky tale that gets the blood pumping and the fine hairs on the back of ones neck standing at attention. Every story has its own twist, its own flavor, and the tale of the Fox Sisters and the Stratford Knockings have a flavor all their own.

The Fox Sisters

Around 1850, many individuals claimed to be able to communicate with the other side. There had been a rise in Spiritualism, a system of religious practice or belief that communication with the dead is possible through a medium. Supposed mediums began popping up everywhere, all claiming that they had a direct line to the afterlife. The cause of this rise (or rather, explosion) can be traced to three sisters, Leah, Kate, and Margaret, but they are more widely known as The Fox Sisters.

Kate (age 12) and Leah (age 15) lived with their parents in a modest house in Hydesville, New York. Although Hydesville no longer exists, it was located just outside Newark. In March of 1848, the girls began to report knocking sounds. At times, it sounded like furniture being moved around. The house was rumored to be haunted, but until this point there was no verification of this.

Kate would often ask the noisemaker, an entity the girls began to call Mr. Splitfoot, a nickname for the devil, to communicate. She would snap her fingers and ask for the entity to repeat the pattern. It would. When she requested it to knock as a response and she would get it. Eventually, the girls created a code in order to communicate with Mr. Splitfoot using a series of knocks that corresponded to the letters of the alphabet. Think along the lines Stranger Things when Joyce hangs Christmas lights and draws the alphabet on the wall to communicate with Will in the Upside Down, but with only knocks. I knew I’d manage to fit a Stranger Things reference in here somewhere. ;).

After some time, the entity identified itself as one Charles B. Rosna, a peddler. According to the spirit, his remains were buried in the cellar following his murder five years prior. No peddler by that name could ever be identified, but a skeleton was found buried in one of the cellar walls in 1904. A manhunt followed and a man named Bell was eventually accused of the crime, having been the previous owner of the house, but was never convicted of murder.  Bell would be ostracized from the community for the rest of his life as a suspected murderer.

During all of the excitement at home, Kate and Margaret resided in nearby Rochester. Kate with her sister Leah and Margaret with her brother David. The strange occurrences followed them. Long time friends of the Fox family (and radical Quakers), Amy and Isaac Post, invited the girls to visit them in their Rochester home and began to tell all of their radical Quaker friends about the girls and their supernatural abilities.

In the first ever public exhibition of Spiritualistic practice in 1850, the sisters, Margaret and Kate, performed seances for a large audience at Corinthian Hall in Rochester. The girls asked questions of the spirits they claimed were present and received definitive answers. Onlookers were enthralled by the spectacle and the sisters became quite popular. That is until the investigations began.

Scientists and doctors at the time believed that the sounds emanated from the girls themselves, saying that clicking joints were the cause of the “rapping.” E. P. Longworthy, a physician, noted that the noises always seemed to come from under the girl’s dresses and never from an outside source. He explained that cracking toe joints, hips, and knees could produce such a sound and, in fact, the sounds the girls created were so loud that they could be heard plainly throughout a large hall.

Many more in the scientific community came forward to cast doubt upon the public seances and, in time, the crowds at the Fox Sister’s events and their popularity dwindled. Margaret attempted to return to the practice later in her life due to financial need.  Although she had confessed to a major newspaper that the rappings were a farce, she tried to recant her statement but to no avail.  At the time of their death, the women were penniless and were interred in pauper’s graves in Brooklyn, NY.

Margaret had this to say about their ruse.

“Mrs. Underhill, my eldest sister, took Katie and me to Rochester. There it was that we discovered a new way to make the raps. My sister Katie was the first to observe that by swishing her fingers she could produce certain noises with her knuckles and joints, and that the same effect could be made with the toes. Finding that we could make raps with our feet – first with one foot and then with both – we practiced until we could do this easily when the room was dark. Like most perplexing things when made clear, it is astonishing how easily it is done. The rapping are simply the result of a perfect control of the muscles of the leg below the knee, which govern the tendons of the foot and allow action of the toe and ankle bones that is not commonly known. Such perfect control is only possible when the child is taken at an early age and carefully and continually taught to practice the muscles, which grow stiffer in later years. … This, then, is the simple explanation of the whole method of the knocks and raps.”

She also wrote:

“A great many people when they hear the rapping imagine at once that the spirits are touching them. It is a very common delusion. Some very wealthy people came to see me some years ago when I lived in Forty-second Street and I did some rappings for them. I made the spirit rap on the chair and one of the ladies cried out: “I feel the spirit tapping me on the shoulder.” Of course that was pure imagination.”

Harry Houdini was devoted to debunking Spiritualist activities and had this to say about the practice of Spiritualism.

“As to the delusion of sound. Sound waves are deflected just as light waves are reflected by the intervention of a proper medium and under certain conditions it is a difficult thing to locate their source. Stuart Cumberland (an English mentalist-added) told me that an interesting test to prove the inability of a blindfolded person to trace sound to its source. It is exceedingly simple; merely clicking two coins over the head of the blindfolded person.”

Stratford Knockings

Eliakim Phelps was a Congregational minister in Stratford, Connecticut in the 1850’s. He and his wife, a much younger woman who had been widowed as he had, and their blended family, lived in a beautiful home. It had been built by Matthias Nicoll for his daughter Elizah and her husband Captain George Dowdall in 1826. Dowdall worked in the China trade and the top floor of the home had been modeled to look like the deck of a ship, but when Dowdall died in China several years following the house being built, it was put up for sale. Phelps saw the property as the perfect place for his family and purchased it, using it seasonally and living the rest of the time in Philadelphia. It is at this point that things begin to get a little strange.

One day, the family, Phelps, his wife, the children (from their previous marriages), and the 3 year old daughter they shared, returned from church to find the house in a shambles. Their belongings were strewn about, clothing and trinkets lay everywhere, and the mirrors in the home had been draped in black funeral crepe. Naturally, the family was taken aback. Who would have done this? Phelps told his family to wait as he explored the house to ensure nobody was hiding inside. Upon inspection, he found no one and realized that nothing had been taken. Assuming it was the work of vandals, he gave the rest of the family the all clear and they proceeded about the task of cleaning up. When Phelps entered the master bedroom, he found a dress laid out on the bed. The arms were crossed over the chest in funeral pose. The dress had belonged to his previous wife, now deceased.

The scene made Phelps uneasy, but he simply brushed it off as a prank. In the weeks and months that followed, there were more strange occurrences.  Books, tools for the fireplace, and a potato would appear in random locations in the house. Items thought to have been under lock and key appeared in plain sight. Items would fall from their places and windows would be smashed. At one point, Phelps send the remainder of the family on to Philadelphia to see if the activity would continue. Something tells me he believed it was the work of one of the children. The activity was less frequent, but continued.

When the whole family was back in the house, they found that the spirit(s) most often communicated with 11 year old Henry. He would ask questions and the spirit(s) would rap out answers. Sound familiar? Friendly spirits would help the family locate lost or misplaced items while “evil” spirits would set fires and break windows.

Newspapers had a field day with the Phelps story. There was much speculation as to the validity of the claims the family made and many wondered if they were simply telling tall tales. A few news outlets stated that they believed the rapping and lost objects were the doing of Phelps’ wife and children. Others claimed he was in on the ruse. The events would start and stop according to the time Henry spent in the house, so the sounds and damage were largely blamed on him.

Phelps eventually sold the home to the publisher of the New York Sun and the family moved away in 1852. There were no further reports of ghostly happenings on the property. The house has long since been demolished, but the story lives on in spooky Connecticut history.

What do you think of Spiritualism? Drop us an email and tell us about your tarot/star readings or experiences with psychics. We’d love to read them. =)

Your Fellow Haunt Head,

Janine

hauntheadscast@gmail.com

Tweet us @hauntheadscast

Facebook: Haunt Heads Podcast

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S2 Ep. 3: Halloween Episode (Sort Of)

S2 Ep. 3: Halloween Episode (Sort Of)

NEW EPISODE AVAILABLE 11/13/2017!

This week, Mimi returns with the tale of Poveglia Island in Venice, Italy, and Janine mesmerizes us with the story of Franz Freidrich Anton Mesmer, the father of Mesmerism.

This episode contains memories from Halloween past, talk of witches and The Craft, being recognized, and shitty people.
*Note: If you’re not a fan of chit chat, we’d suggest you begin listening at about 20 minutes in.

Mesmerism: An exploration of wild hand gestures and animal magnetism.

I’m a Halloweenie. I just can’t help it. There’s something about the cooler evenings of Fall that bring out the goblin in me and cause me to ransack the basement in search of fake spiderwebs and inflatables. Maybe it’s the change in the weather, the fact that I can wear my regular wardrobe (seriously, I’m addicted to hooded sweatshirts), or the fact that there’s pumpkin spice EVERYTHING. I don’t know. All I know is, the mere sight of the Halloween section in a store, no matter how minuscule, makes my heart flutter and instantly transports me to a time when my dad and I would ransack the neighborhood for candy treats in one of the many homemade costumes he had designed and crafted for me. But that was a long time ago.

Since the days of trick or treating with my dad, I’ve moved from Newfoundland, Canada, to Milwaukee, WI. I’ve also aged 22 years. I’ve gotten married and purchased a house. In the purchase of my home came a new conundrum. Trick or Treat. There isn’t one. Well, let me clarify, it’s terrible. We get MAYBE four kids a year and apparently, because we’re on a main street, that’s a banner number. I’ve tried reaching out to my neighborhood group to gain some insight into the issue, but I generally get the runaround. That’s why I’m looking for other ways to celebrate my favorite season. That’s why, on October 29th, I attended a play.

The Sunset Playhouse in Elm Grove, WI, put on a production in which they read through  a handful of the works of Edgar Allen Poe. My dear Edgar had such a whimsical way of looking at madness and mayhem that I thought would be most appropriate given the season. I attended and sat in silence as they read through classics like The Raven and The Black Cat. They even did Hopfrog, a piece that sometimes gets overlooked for its macabre qualities. Although I was disappointed with the attire of the actors, one wore a dress that appeared to have been made out of sweatshirt material and there wasn’t a cravat in sight, their delivery of Poe’s work was very well done. As a cherry on the evening (in my opinion), they did a read through of The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar, a story that offers a very interesting look into the practice of mesmerism.

Valdemar is mesmerized at the point of death in an experimental effort to separate Valdemar’s mind from his body to see exactly how long his death could be postponed. Mesmerizing the patient essentially involves the narrator in the story motioning with his hands, supposedly pushing and pulling some unseen energy into and out of the half-alive Valdemar.  The narrator inquires into Valdemar’s well being throughout the procedure of being mesmerized, asking repeatedly if he is “asleep.” Valdemar responds over and over to the narrator’s questions, stating that he is indeed still asleep, but bade’s the narrator to let him “die so.”

The story as a whole is very interesting, but it is more than just a mere story. You see, Poe didn’t just make up a story (or two or three) about mesmerism. He was crafting a commentary on the very real practice of mesmerization, one that could be seen repeated by many a practitioner during Poe’s time.

Mesmerized

Franz Freidrich Anton Mesmer was born in Germany in 1734 and became a physician with a noted interest in astronomy. Mesmer had a theory that there was some sort of natural transference of energy between inanimate and animated objects which he called animal magnetism, later referred to as mesmerism. It was a popular theory between around 1780 and 1850 and held sway over a great many people who believed that Mesmer was actually able to control this energy.

Mesmer grew up in the village of Iznang, on the shore of Lake Constance in Swabia and attended a couple of Jesuit universities before eventually taking up the practice of medicine at the University of Vienna in 1759. The doctoral dissertation he wrote in 1766 entitled De planetarum influxu in corpus humanum (On the Influence of the Planets on the Human Body). The work basically expounded upon  Isaac Newton’s theory of the tides, stating certain tides in the human body  might be accounted for by the movements of the celestial bodies within the solar system. It has been suggested that Mesmer plagiarized a part of his dissertation from a work by Richard Mead, English physician and a close friend of Newton. Luckily for Mesmer, during this particular time period, it didn’t matter whether or not the work was plagiarized. In 1768, he married a wealthy widow named Anna Maria von Posch and worked on establishing himself as a physician in Vienna. 

In 1774, Mesmer produced his first reaction within a patient using his theory of animal magnetism. He referred to it as creating an “artificial tide” within his patient, Francisca Osterlin, who suffered from hysteria (just as a footnote, some believed that hysteria was caused by the occasional tendency of a woman’s uterus to wander around inside her body, causing madness). Mesmer had Osterlin swallow a concoction containing iron filings, then proceeded to attach magnets to various parts of her body. The patient reported a sensation of streams of “mysterious fluid” running all through her body and felt relief of the symptoms she’d reported for several hours afterward. Mesmer was a humble sort and did not believe the magnets had anything to do with curing Osterlin. He believed that his own animal magnetism had been transferred to her and that he, himself, was the cure. I think perhaps Osterlin mistook the power of suggestion for mezmerism.

Mesmer continued to treat his patients using his technique and even offered group sessions. For individuals, he would sit directly in front of the patient and press his knees against his patients knees. He would then press his thumbs into the backs of the patients hands and look into his patients eyes. Mesmer would then move his hands from the patients shoulders, down his arms, and concluded the treatment by pressing his fingers on the area just below the diaphragm. Many patients reported feeling “peculiar” or convulsed afterward. Mesmer regarded these as “crises” leaving the body and that they would bring about relief of his patients symptoms. These treatments were often followed by some sort of musical interlude. It was all very theatrical. As Mesmer brought his patients deeper into a trance, many would swoon or make noise. Mesmer, draped in a flowing gown, would wave his hands over each of the patient’s bodies, transferring his healing energy to them.

For group sessions, Mesmer would prepare a “baquet” for his patients. The process was described by an English physician who witnessed one such treatment (around 1780.)

In the middle of the room is placed a vessel of about a foot and a half high which is called here a “baquet”. It is so large that twenty people can easily sit round it; near the edge of the lid which covers it, there are holes pierced corresponding to the number of persons who are to surround it; into these holes are introduced iron rods, bent at right angles outwards, and of different heights, so as to answer to the part of the body to which they are to be applied. Besides these rods, there is a rope which communicates between the baquet and one of the patients, and from him is carried to another, and so on the whole round. The most sensible effects are produced on the approach of Mesmer, who is said to convey the fluid by certain motions of his hands or eyes, without touching the person. I have talked with several who have witnessed these effects, who have convulsions occasioned and removed by a movement of the hand… 

Not surprisingly, Mesmer’s “treatment” didn’t always work. In 1777, when Mesmer’s cure all failed to treat the blindness of an 18-year-old musician, Maria Theresia Paradis, Mesmer was ridiculed and left Vienna, eventually settling in Paris. He set up a practice in the most affluent part of the city and began accepting patients. The city was split on Mesmer. Some believed he was a charlatan while others believed that he had made some miraculous discovery.

A physician of high acclaim at the time, a Dr. Charles  d’Eslon, appreciated the fact that Mesmer understood health as the free flow of the process of life through thousands of different channels. Overcoming obstacles (illness) that inhibited the flow through these channels produced “crises” which restored health to the patient. Often, a patient might not be able to accomplish this on their own, calling into employ someone like Mesmer ( a conductor of animal magnetism) who could safely accelerate the process. In some instances, curing insanity might call for causing a fit of madness. Achieving a cure in a safe environment was beneficial for all involved.

A Doctor or A Fool?

In 1784, to Mesmer’s chagrin I’m sure, King Louis XVI called together four members of the Faculty of Medicine to investigate the process of Mesmerization. They examined whether or not Mesmer had discovered a new physical fluid, not necessarily whether or not his process worked, but at the end of their investigation three of the four commissioners decided there was no evidence to prove such a fluid was in existence. The final commissioner, a botanist, took exception to the official final report. Antoine Laurent de Jussieu declared Mesmer’s theory credible and worthy of further investigation, but it is likely that opinion was largely ignored.  After this point, Mesmer faded from the limelight. He was driven into exile soon after the investigations concluded and was ridiculed for his practices.

According to Abbé Faria, an Indo-Portuguese monk in Paris and a contemporary of Mesmer, said “nothing comes from the magnetizer; everything comes from the subject and takes place in his imagination, i.e. autosuggestion generated from within the mind.”

Have you ever been mesmerized or hypnotized? What were your experiences? I’d love to read them. =)

Your Fellow Haunt Head,

Janine

hauntheadscast@gmail.com

Tweet us @hauntheadscast

Facebook: Haunt Heads Podcast

 

HAPPY HALLOWEEN!!

Jack-o'-Lantern_2003-10-31.jpg

 

Red Eyed Monster

It’s named for the color of its aluminum paint and carries travelers  over the Ohio River on U.S. Route 35, connecting Point Pleasant, West Virginia and Gallipolis, Ohio. I’m speaking, of course, of the Silver Bridge, the bridge that collapsed in December of 1967 around Christmastime. After some investigation, a faulty eye bar in the suspension chain was said to be to blame for the collapse, the bridge was almost always carrying a higher load than it should and was poorly maintained, but some residents of Point Pleasant believe that something more sinister lies at the heart of the disaster that claimed the lives of 46 people (2 bodies were never recovered). Some of those residents claim a creature that has wound its way into the history of Point Pleasant, and popular culture in general, was the culprit. That creature was a being called Mothman.

Red Eyes

Prior to the collapse of the Silver Bridge, several residents of Point Pleasant had communicated to their friends, neighbors, and the authorities, that they had seen a strange creature in the skies above the small city. It was large and birdlike, but the most memorable and often repeated feature were the creatures glowing red eyes.

The first appearance of Mothman can be traced to Clendin, West Virginia, when a group of men digging a grave observed a strange creature circling above them (Nov. 1966). They said it was human-like and remained high over their heads for a short time before disappearing over the treetops and out of sight.

Just a few days later, (Nov. 15) in Point Pleasant, two couples reported seeing a white-winged creature with glowing eyes with the beams of their car headlights. Two witnesses, one of them Steve Mallette, one of the individuals in one of the cars, said “it was like a man with wings. It wasn’t anything like you’d seen on TV or in a monster movie.” The Point Pleasant Register reported, “Couples See Man-Sized Bird…Creature…Something.” Mallette and his wife had been driving near the McClintie Wildlife Reserve on West Virginia Route 62 at the time.

The other witness, Roger Scarberry, gave very specific information about the creature’s eyes, stating that they were about 2″ in diameter and 6″ apart. Scarberry stated that he might not have said anything if there hadn’t been so many people who reported seeing it. He might have dismissed it as a trick of his eyes and gone about his business, but the fact that 3 other people saw what he did, he felt compelled to relate his story. Scarberry and his wife were also driving near the McClintie Wildlife Reserve at the time of their sighting. Scarberry stated that their vehicle came to a hill and, as they crested it, they saw the creature with their headlights. They claimed it was 7′ tall and had a 10′ wingspan. Scarberry swerved to avoid hitting the figure, but mere seconds later, the creature was back in front of their car. It kept pace with their car as they sped back toward town, sometimes reaching speeds of 100 mph. At times, it would soar to almost 50′ above them, only to return moments later in front of them. The couple were forced to stop and observed the creature seemingly laying on the road in a lump. Too afraid to investigate, they turned their car around and headed back to town. They returned later that evening with a Sheriff’s Deputy, but the creature was gone. However, they did find a strange pile of dust where the creature had been.

mothmanpress01

Point Pleasant Register Newspaper, 11-25-1966 http://cryptozoologynews.com/mothman-richardsons/

Many reported seeing Mothman both in the Wildlife Reserve and on their private property. Reports flooded the local paper. Residents stated they’d heard noises outside at night and, when they went to investigate, they came upon the creature with the beam of their flashlights. Others claim Mothman is responsible for eating their beloved family pets. A farmer told the Point Pleasant Register that his German shepherd disappeared after he’d seen a creature with large, glowing red eyes.

Sightings of the Mothman continued and came to a head in 1967 with the collapse of the Silver Bridge, leading many to believe that Mothman was a harbinger of doom and that his presence in Point Pleasant either brought about or predicted the disaster. Others are firm in their belief that Mothman predicted the tragedies and appeared as a warning to the tragedy. John Keel, writer of the book The Mothman Prophecies (the book was made into a movie in 2002), claims that residents of Point Pleasant were experiencing premonitions of the bridge collapse and tried to voice their concerns to others who brushed it off as superstition.

Wildlife experts believe that a large bird, perhaps a sandhill crane or a barred owl, is to blame for the sightings. This doesn’t explain the missing pets (sandhill cranes just wouldn’t find a schnauzer appetizing and a German shepherd is far too large for either bird to contend with), but many accepted this explanation. Other residents and experts feel that Mothman falls into the realm of cryptozoological phenomena, to be categorized with the likes of Bigfoot, the Yeti, and the Loch Ness Monster. Some have even claimed that Mothman has been seen prior to other catastrophic events around the globe including 9-11.

Shows like Monster Quest have tried debunking the Mothman legends, claiming that those who have supposedly seen the creature are simply mistaken. MQ created wood cutouts of various sizes of the creature with red reflectors attached in hopes of figuring out whether the size and shape descriptions of the creature are entirely accurate. They claim there are many ways in which fear can influence memory and distort it, leading them to believe that a 3′ figure is actually 7-10′ tall. Apparently, people who view horrific things are highly confident in what they have seen or are seeing and they exaggerate certain features. Perhaps those who have seen Mothman exaggerated the glowing red eyes of the creature and are now so confident in what they have seen that it has become fact?

Festival

In September each year, the residents of Point Pleasant hold a festival for Mothman (https://www.mothmanfestival.com/) commemorating the original, 1966 sighting of the creature. The town is now home to a Mothman Museum, featuring witness sketches and accounts, newspaper articles, and merchandise, and a large statue of Mothman with a plaque outlining the first sighting. Attendance to the festival, featuring bands, guest speakers, and various merch vendors, is a must for anyone who wishes to learn more about Point Pleasant’s cryptozoological wonder and, if you’re brave, take a trip out to the Wildlife Reserve to perhaps see the creature himself. Linda Scarberry says she can still hear the sound of the creature’s wings above their car and she still has trouble sleeping. Just keep that in mind as you venture forth into the dark unknown.

Your Fellow Haunt Head,

Janine

hauntheadscast@gmail.com

Tweet us @hauntheadscast

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Listen to episodes of Haunt Heads at hauntheads.podbean.com, iTunes, or wherever you listen to podcasts and don’t forget to leave us an iTunes review!!

Humans Can Lick, Too.

It’s a quiet night in a quaint, suburban neighborhood and an elderly lady and her dog have just settled down for an evening of reading and relaxation. She’s got a cup of tea and a blanket and, before she realizes it, she’s drifting off into peaceful slumber, petting her dog.

Shortly after midnight, the woman awakes to a strange noise. It sounds as if a tap somewhere in the house is dripping. She rises from bed and heads downstairs to the kitchen to check the faucet. She ensures that both taps are off and makes her way back to bed. As she slides beneath the covers, she reaches her hand down the side of the bed to check on her faithful dog. The dog licks her hand and the woman falls back to sleep once more.

A short time later, the woman awakes again to the same dripping sound. This time, she checks the upstairs bathroom. She inspects the faucet, but it’s not dripping. She turns to check the shower and, upon pulling back the shower curtain she is horrified to find her faithful dog, hanging by its neck, its intestines hanging out. Blood is dripping from the entrails into the drain. On the wall, there is a message in blood.

“Human’s can lick, too!”

The woman turns to look into the face of the murderer.

According to Snopes.com(http://www.snopes.com/horrors/madmen/lighton.asp), even the legends circulating today have roots that run deep. The “licked hand” shows up in a diary entry penned in England in August of 1871 by a man named Dearman Birchall. Birchall writes,

“Croquet party . . . [One of the guests] told of a clergyman who was aroused in the middle of the night by his wife who said ‘John, dear, I am sure there is a robber under the bed, I hear him moving. Do get up and see.’ John replied, ‘Oh its only the Newfoundland dog. I just put my hand out and he licked it’. Next morning all the jewellery and many other effects had disappeared.”

This urban legend also dates  back to 1919. In a story titled, “The Diary of Mr. Poynter” by M. R. James, a young man reclines while reading and absently strokes (what he believes to be) his dog. Spoiler: his dog is already dead.

In some incarnations, the elderly woman is replaced by a nubile young girl. In some instances, she’s a co-ed. The story is often told to those in college, particularly freshmen. In others, she’s a preteen. The appearance of the message scrawled in blood varies as well. The text is found on the floor in the bathroom or on the mirror above the sink. The woman then sees the image of her soon-to-be murderer reflected behind her. The fate of the dog also changes. Sometimes it’s just hanged, occasionally the dog is found completely skinned, as is the case in the above incarnation of this tale, the dog is completely disemboweled. Depending on the storyteller, there are cases in which the woman does not even leave her bed the first time as she is frightened by the strange noise. She simply reaches her hand down to be comforted by the dog who, at this point in the tale, is already dead.

Chain Letter

The story of the licking madman can also be traced to a chain letter that circulated on the internet several years ago. The story is basically the same, but with a few variations. According to the chain letter version, the story is set in a town called Farmersburg. The name conjures an image you might find on the front of a butter tub, bright sunshine, lush green fields, and quiet, tight knit neighborhoods. The setting is also a perfect storm. People feel safe in their routines, in familiar surroundings and, as the chain letter illustrates, that sense of safety is not realistic.

A young girl is left at home while her parents head out for an overnight trip. She is told to lock every window and door, and does so with the exception of a window in the basement that will close, but won’t lock. She locks the basement door to be safe, and snuggles up with the dog to go to sleep. At some point during the night, the girl wakes with a start. It sounds like a tap somewhere in the house is dripping, so she ignores it and tries to go back to sleep, reaching for her dog on the floor. When the dog licks her hand, she feels safe and drifts back to sleep. In the morning, the girl awakes to find the dog missing. She heads to the kitchen to check the tap and sees her parents pulling down the driveway through the window. She heads upstairs to the bathroom to take a shower and finds the family dog skinned and hanging from the shower rod. The dog’s blood is dripping into a growing puddle on the floor. The girl quickly runs to her bedroom in search of a weapon, just in case the culprit is still in the house, but she comes upon a message scrawled on a piece of paper on the floor by her bed. It’s written in blood. “Humans can lick too, beautiful.”

Whether you’ve heard the story around a campfire or you received the chain letter in your email, it’s likely that you’re already familiar with this urban legend. It’s quite popular and often used to strike fear into the hearts of children who insist on being  mature enough to be left alone at home. As the story illustrates, bad things happen to those who ignore their personal safety and lull themselves into a false sense of security. Often, the darkest things happen to those who live in the “safest” places.

Pleasant dreams.

Your Fellow Haunt Head,

Janine

hauntheadscast@gmail.com

Tweet us @hauntheadscast

hauntheads.podbean.com (or wherever you listen to podcasts).

 

COMING SOON!

New episodes of Haunt Heads will be available at hauntheads.podbean.com (or wherever you listen to podcasts) on Oct. 12. The blog and podcast will offer new content on a biweekly schedule beginning at that time. Stay tuned! We’ve got a lot of new, interesting stuff coming down the pike. =)

Your Fellow Haunt Head,

Janine

hauntheadscast@gmail.com

Tweet us @hauntheadscast

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S1 Ep. 18 Grace and Doppelgangers

Mimi’s on vacay this week, but Janine’s got some creepy stuff to share. First, explore the (now demolished) Grace General Hospital in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada, where ghostly apparitions roam the nurse’s residence, searching for release. Then, enjoy a tale of double walkers, more familiarly known as doppelgangers, and the strange case of Emilee Sagee. This episode contains nostalgia, gardening and astral projection, a creepy little boy in a hospital gown, and footprints leading to nowhere.

Find this weeks episode at hauntheads.podbean.com or wherever you listen to podcasts!

If you listen to us on iTunes, please take a moment to leave us a review. We’d really appreciate it. =)