S2 Ep. 4: Burrito Ghosts

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A new intro, but the same old dance from us!

S2 Ep. 4: Burrito Ghosts

Janine explores the practice of Spiritualism and tells the tale of the Stratford Knockings and the Fox Sisters. Mimi again takes us across the pond to the Thirsk Museum in Thirsk, North Yorkshire, UK, for a sit and a cuppa. Whatever you do, don’t sit in Busby’s Chair!

This episode contains turkey talk and traditions, a (potentially) dropped burrito, an entity named “Mr. Splitfoot,” and a little healthy raggin’ on Bagans.

Music/Intro
St. James Infirmary, is generously provided by Fox and Branch and is used with their permission. For more info about them and additional samples of their music, visit their website HERE. You can also purchase digital and physical copies of their CD’s, which is something we’re sure they’d love. =)

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S1 Ep. 20 Labor Day Special: Season 1 Finale

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S1 Ep. 20 Labor Day Special: Season 1 Finale
We decided to round off Season 1, and our Labor Day episode, with a feature length special! In this episode, Mimi discusses Annabelle, the Ryman Theater (Auditorium) in Nashville, TN, and The Black Angel of Oakland Cemetery in Iowa City, IA. Janine, in an effort to return to her roots, tells the haunting tale of the Wabana Iron Ore Mines on Bell Island, Newfoundland, Canada, and regails us with the very creepy urban legend of The Body Under the Bed. Spoiler: It’s more true than you think.
This episode contains discussions of Mimi’s narcolepsy, listener shout outs, eclipse observations, and getting older.
Disclaimer: Janine’s piece, The Body Under the Bed, might be a tad too creepy for some listeners. The piece runs from 1hr 35 mins-1hr 51 mins. Feel free to skip it if you’re easily creeped out. Though it doesn’t contain graphic depictions of violence, it is a little “icky”.
Haunt Heads will return in about 4 weeks with new episodes and blog content. Stay tuned and thanks for listening!

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Motel Hell

For a short time, I worked at a motel. I won’t say the name, I feel like it’ll be easy enough to figure out which one by the time you reach the end of this post, but I will say that it takes a special type of person to work in the motel environment. Room turnovers are high and cleaning duties are often ignored due to this fact. Most of the employees at the motel I worked at had the mildest sense of a work ethic, the rest couldn’t be bothered, but you can’t clean almost two hundred rooms in pristine fashion if you don’t care. That’s kind of where today’s post takes a darker turn.

While I was employed at the motel, I came to realize that there were lots of things happening behind those closed doors that I never thought would be. Prostitution, pill scams, abuses of people and drugs, you name it, the motel catered to that clientele. It was rundown, desperately in need of exterior and interior painting, and every bathroom in that place needed sandblasting. I’m not here today to talk about the problems at this particular hotel, but I am going to discuss one particularly grotesque urban legend once again making the rounds online and by word of mouth. It’s titled, “The Body Under the Bed.”

When you pay for 2 guests, but someone’s forgotten to check out…

Imagine for a moment that you’ve just checked into your motel on the Vegas strip. It’s a beautiful evening and you and your significant other are taking a much needed vacation to celebrate your wedding anniversary. The staff at the front desk was friendly and, as you walk to your room, unlock the door with your keycard, and set your bags inside, you notice the room is actually quite nice. It’s nice, aside from a strange odor you can’t quite place. You and your partner check the garbage for leftover food, you pull out all the drawers in search of discarded waste, but you find nothing. You put in a call to the front desk.

The desk clerk, friendly as ever, apologizes profusely for the inconvenience and offers to have housekeeping come to your room to do a thorough cleaning. There are no other rooms available that he could move you into. You say that’s fine. You wanted to do some gambling and grab a bite to eat. You tell the clerk you’ll be back in two or three hours and exit your room.

You return at the aforementioned time and throw open your room door. The smell lingers. It’s like sour milk and a damp blanket that had been left to mildew had a disgusting, putrefying baby. You once again call the desk. You get the same answer. The clerk again apologizes and offers to call around to other hotels and motels to see if there is any availability. He hangs up, but calls back shortly thereafter saying every other place is booked. He offers again for housekeeping to tidy the room. You agree. You need a place to sleep and the car is out of the question, so you try to manage as best you can, opening all the windows. Housekeeping replaces all the towels, linens, pillows, and draperies. Once they leave, the smell from the cleaning chemicals they’ve used lingers long enough for you and your other half to get to sleep.

In the morning, you awake to the phantom smell. It’s stronger than before, even with the windows open. You decide you can’t stay another minute, pack your belongings, and leave the motel.

The manager examines the room later in the day, after housekeeping has done its work. Everything is in its place, right down to the towels folded to industry specifications, but there’s still a smell. The manager, frustrated by the situation, tears the room apart. As he’s standing in front of the bed, looking at the war torn scene around him, he decides to flip the mattress. It’s worth a shot.

He removes the mattress and is instantly hit with the smell of something rotting. He can see nothing, so he lifts the box spring. Shrinking back in horror, the manager comes face to face with the decaying remains of a woman, hidden beneath the box spring.

In the hotel/motel industry, mattresses aren’t flipped very often, making them an opportune place to stash a corpse.

Not Untrue.

This may be an urban legend, but it seems as if every urban legend is rooted in some sort of fact. This legend is no exception. The location chosen for this particular tale, Las Vegas, otherwise known as Sin City, is also the setting for the kidney snatcher urban legend. What happens in Vegas…

In 2003, a body was found beneath a mattress in at Capri Motel in Kansas City, Missouri (reported by Fox News). Police were called to the motel after cleaning crews found the body of a man that appeared to have been dead for several days. The body was only found after repeated complaints from guests about the smell.

In Memphis at the Budget Inn, a mother who disappeared in January of 2010 was found under a hotel mattress, two months after she was reported missing. Sony Millbrook had been renting the room, but had stopped making payments. The motel boxed up her belongings and continued to rent the room. That’s protocol in many hotels and motels. It had been rented numerous times before her body was finally found by cleaning staff. According to Memphis Police Deputy Chief of investigative services, Joseph Scott, the case was “stranger than fiction” (Daily Mail). He’d never heard of anything like this happening before.

In November of last year, a body was found under a hotel bed in Mexico City. A woman had checked into Hotel El Senador one week prior to her body being found. The mattresses in the hotel were set on top of square bases that could be easily lifted. The body had been wrapped in plastic and stashed under the base of the bed and was eventually found by cleaning staff. However, the room had been rented at least a half a dozen times prior to the remains being found.

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dailymail.co.uk

In Pattaya, Thailand, in August of last year, several couples had stayed in a hotel room with the recently deceased. A woman’s body had been stashed under a mattress for roughly 10 days prior to being found. The victim was identified as 28-year-old Amphon Kongsong, a transgender woman who had checked into the room on behalf of two teenagers. Shortly after they had settled into the room, it is speculated that one of the teens strangled Kongsong following an argument, then the two hid her body under the mattress, and left the hotel. A maid noticed “blood and a strong smell” coming from under the mattress, but only after the room had been rented several times.

Reports of found bodies go back farther than 1994 and accounts of recent found remains don’t seem to be letting up. Luckily, the only disgusting find I’d had during my time in the motel industry was a pile of mummified fried chicken. I guess some people don’t realize that’s not what the cool side of the mattress is good for. We didn’t have mini fridges, so I suppose it was the motel’s bad. Perhaps the tale of the body under the bed began as an urban legend, but it seems to have grown in both popularity and practice.

Do you have a hotel/motel horror story from your city or town? Let us know in the comments or drop an email to hauntheadscast@gmail.com.

Your fellow Haunt Head,

Janine

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S1 Ep. 13 So Many Knights (Nights)

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Mimi continues her voyage to the dark side this week with the tale of Giles DeRey, compatriot to Joan of Ark, child murderer, and necrophiliac. Janine explores vampire folklore and legend in a little piece she likes to call Bird of Death.
Disclaimer: Mimi’s piece is a little creep-tastic this week. If you’re faint of heart or just don’t enjoy graphic descriptions of violence, skip to the 20 minute mark.
Have a folklore story from your neck of the woods that you’d like to share? Experience some ghostly or otherwise unexplainable phenomena? Drop us a line! We’d love to read about your experiences and share them on an upcoming minisode! hauntheadscast@gmail.com is your friend. =)

Please take a moment to leave us a review on iTunes. We’d very much appreciate your feedback!

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NEW EPISODE AVAILABLE! S1 EP.8 LEAN IN AND LISTEN

NEW EPISODE AVAILABLE! S1 Ep. 8 Lean In and Listen

“This is a true story. It happened to a friend of a friend of mine…”

It’s a warm summer night in 1950. Maybe Earth Angel is playing on the radio. Maybe a teenage boy has borrowed his father’s Studebaker to impress his girl. Maybe he’s brought her to Lovers’ Lane, a quiet patch of field at the end of a winding gravel drive. It’s dark and secluded, but that’s what he’s looking for.

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As they settle in for an evening of romance, their musical interlude is interrupted by an urgent news bulletin. A mad man has escaped from the local asylum, a criminal deviant bent on murder and mayhem. Police are actively seeking a suspect. He’s got a hook for a hand. The asylum lies just a half mile from their parking spot.
The Good Ending
The girl grows concerned over sounds emanating from outside the car. Metal on metal. Scratching. Obviously, the romantic allure of the backseat and the crooning of the love song have worn off. She’s so scared that she demands they leave immediately. The fine hairs on the back of her neck are at attention, bristled, suddenly very aware of another presence lingering just beyond the car door. She’s petrified. Her male companion is less than amused, having had his romantic evening thwarted, but he agrees to take her home. He throws the car into gear and they speed down the drive toward home.
They pull up in front of her house a short time later and, in the interest of chivalry and the hope that he might get another chance later on down the line, he jogs around the car to her door to open it. As he reaches for the handle, he sees it: a bloody metal hook hanging there, glinting in the moonlight.
The Bad Ending
The boyfriend, irritated by his girlfriends irrational fear, says he’ll take her home after he goes to relieve himself. He leaves her into the car and disappears into the darkness. After a time, the girlfriend begins to hear scraping sounds on the roof of the car. She gets out of the car to see what the noise might be and comes face to face with her boyfriends butchered body. He’s hanging upside down from a tree, his fingers scraping against the roof of the car.
This legend is an oldie, but definitely a good-ie!
It seems as if this legend was designed to frighten, hoping that fear would fix the problem of the insatiable teenage libido, but you could also read into the story a little more. If you channel your inner Freud, you could find all sorts of sexual overtones and imagery. The teenage boy who wants to “get his hooks” into the girl. The tearing off of the hook could symbolize castration. The radio broadcast acting as a sort of voice of reason or conscience, jarring the teens out of their romantic mood.
The Hook Man is a popular urban legend. I’ve heard it more than once while settled around a glowing camp fire in the woods. For me, it was a tale meant to frighten and titillate. A story to make us believe that, at any moment, a hook-handed crazy man would burst through the tree line and flay us all, as the popular fantasy/slasher film Candyman put so aptly, “from [our] groin[s] to [our] gullet[s].”

Candyman

Here’s My Advice…
Interestingly enough, the first appearance of The Hook Man legend in print was in a Dear Abby column on Nov. 8, 1960.
DEAR ABBY: If you are interested in teenagers, you will print this story. I don’t know whether it’s true or not, but it doesn’t matter because it served its purpose for me:
A fellow and his date pulled into their favorite “lovers’ lane” to listen to the radio and do a little necking. The music was interrupted by an announcer who said there was an escaped convict in the area who had served time for rape and robbery. He was described as having a hook instead of a right hand. The couple became frightened and drove away. When the boy took his girl home, he went around to open the car door for her. Then he saw — a hook on the door handle! I don’t think I will ever park to make out as long as I live. I hope this does the same for other kids.
It is interesting that the only consistent part of The Hook Man legend, throughout all incarnations of the tale, is that the maniac wears the prosthetic on his right hand. Never his left.
Legendary Criteria
According to Elissa Michelle Zacher, a writer from The Epoch Times, who penned an article entitled, “Urban Legends: Modern Morality Tales” (2010), in order for The Hook Man story to be classified as an urban legend, it must meet the following criteria.
1. The story must contain outrageous content in an everyday setting: The Hook Man escaping from the insane asylum. What sort of prison or asylum allows a criminal to keep his hook prosthetic while incarcerated?
2. The origin of the story is anonymous: The story has been around for so long, nobody really knows where or how it originated.
3. There are multiple incarnations of the story: The Hook Man is sometimes hiding in the back seat of a car. In some incarnations, the boyfriend gets out of the car to urinate and the girlfriend stays inside the car. She then later hears scraping on the roof of the car. Her boyfriend is hanging from a tree branch above the car, his boots scraping on the roof. Sometimes, the woman is at the gas station and goes to get back in her car when her hamstrings are sliced through. She falls to the ground and the hook man pulls her under the car, brutally maiming her with his hook. In yet another story, the couple run out of gas on a deserted highway. The girlfriend stays in the car while her boyfriend goes in search of a fueling station. She falls asleep and is awoken by a state trooper who tells her to get out of the car and not look back. She does and sees her boyfriends mutilated corpse hanging from a tree.
4. No matter who tells the story, it begins with “it happened to a friend of a friend of mine.”: There is no real credibility and no person to hold accountable for factual information.
5. There are some aspects of the story that are plausible and have a ring of truth: Young lovers let their libidos get the better of them and let their guard down. Something bad happens. A couple run out of gas. An escaped mental patient. A deserted location. Car trouble. Murder.
6. The story serves a purpose, either as a cautionary tale or otherwise: A cautionary tale about the dangers of premarital sex. A warning about spending time in abandoned places. No one can hear you scream.
The legend of The Hook Man was carefully curated by parents and caregivers to deter hormonal teens from unsavory activities on lovers’ lanes throughout North America. Often, it’s easier for parents to offer a narrative in place of logical explanation to get a point across, though many people under the age of 30 might think it’s a child of Hollywood. Movies like I Know What You Did Last Summer have plucked the Hook Man figure straight from urban legend, but that doesn’t mean there’s nothing to fear.
Urban Legends Brought to Life
In the 1930’s, a man described as wearing shabby clothes and around 40 attacked two couples in secluded locations, similar to locations that might be used for popular make out spots, on two separate occasions. In one instance, a man was killed outright and a woman was sexually assaulted. He released the woman close to a bus stop with a letter to be sent to the press. The letter made little sense, but stated that the man had been killed because he possessed secret government documents and that the killer was an international secret agent. The killer was never caught. Seven years later, there was another double murder, but in this instance both victims were found with red bulls eyes on their foreheads.
In 1946, the small town of Texarkana, Texas was terrorized by a ghoul called The Phantom Killer or the Texarkana Phantom. Over the course of 3 months, 8 people were murdered, all had parked at Lovers’ Lanes. The Phantom Killer’s spree began on February 22, his first victims Jimmy Hollis, 25, and Mary Jeanne Larey, 19. Hollis was ordered out of the car by gunpoint and told to pull down his pants. He was then struck in the head with a heavy object, cracking his skull. He attempted to rob the couple and struck Larey with the object as well, then telling her to run for her life. Larey, unable to navigate the undergrowth in her heels, was easy prey. The killer was able to catch her and assaulted her with the barrel of his gun. Both survived the attack and gave a description of the phantom, stating he was wearing a white hood with eye and mouth holes cut into it.

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A month later, Richard Griffin, 29, and Polly Ann Moore, 17, were parked in a popular make out spot. A driver passing by thought the couple had fallen asleep in their car, but upon approaching realized the two had both been shot in the back of the head.
Next, Paul Martin, 16, and Betty Jo Booker, 15, were killed in a remote location. A couple in their 30’s were also murdered in their home, though some wonder if this murder was committed by the same person.justice6n-2-web
Reigniting the anxieties of Texarkana residents, The Town That Dreaded Sundown was released in 1976, claiming to tell the stories of the murders exactly as they happened.  At the end of the film, we see a figure from the ankles down, feet clad in combat boots, standing in line at the movie theater. The Phantom Killer was never caught.
The Zodiac Killer also enjoyed haunting secluded locations like lovers’ lanes. The Zodiac murdered his first victims in Benicia, California in December, 1968. David Faraday and Betty Lou Jensen had stopped to park at around 10 P.M. The couple were discovered less than an hour later, shot to death and lying on the ground beside their car.


In July, 1969, Darlene Ferrin and Michael Mageau, 22 and 19 respectively, parked at a secluded spot in Blue Rock Springs Park in Vallejo, California. Michael was shot in the head but survived his injuries. Darlene was not so lucky. Police originally thought that Darlene’s husband was to blame for the murder, Darlene and Michael were engaged in an affair, but he had an airtight alibi. The Zodiac has never been identified, aside from though speculation, but his motives were clear: he enjoyed killing, likening it to hunting wild game.

amd-son-of-sam-jpgDavid Berkowitz, The Son of Sam, was also keen on finding his victims in flagrante delicto. In July, 1976, Berkowitz shot two women who were parked in a parking lot. In total, Berkowitz killed 6 people and injured 7 more.

Legends Survive
Whether based on actual fact or a simple tale of abstinence, the tale of The Hook Man is a riveting urban legend. Over time, it has evolved and shifted to suit the time in which it is told and put down roots in our collective psyches. How many of us have heard this story, been frightened by it, and gone on to relay it to some other unsuspecting individual? How many of us have gathered with our peers around a blazing campfire, placed a flashlight under our chin, and let fear reign.

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S1 Ep. 5 Bundy Fundy or Bridge Over Troubled Water

Episode 5 is now available for download! Find it at hauntheads.podbean.com or on iTunes at https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/haunt-heads-podcast/id1229525500?mt=2.

S1 Ep. 5 Bundy Fundy or Bridges Over Troubled Water

Mimi brings you the tale of Seven Bridges in South Milwaukee, WI, and Janine brings Bundy and the story of how his childhood home in Tacoma, WA, might just be haunted. This episode includes movie reviews, true crime, a rant about how ridiculously expensive cable is, a terrible impersonation of Buffalo Bill, and more of Mimi’s infectious laugh.

A Haunting of Bundy Proportions

It’s all over the internet: Ted Bundy’s Childhood Home HAUNTED! No murders ever occurred in the home (that I’ve been able to confirm) and Bundy had long left home by the time he was arrested. What do we make of this story?
About Bundy
If you don’t know who Ted Bundy is, you should perhaps lift the edge of your rock every once in a while. He was only one of the most prolific serial killers EVER, but he wasn’t always such a famous individual. Bundy was born on Nov. 24, 1946 in Burlington, Vermont, and, by the time of his arrest in 1975, it is said that he murdered at least 36 people, though some believe that number could be 100 or more.
Bundy was a rapist, murderer, burglar, serial killer, and necrophile. When he was arrested in ’75 for failure to stop for a police officer, several items were found in his possession indicating that Bundy had a dark hobby. A crowbar, handcuffs, trash bags, an ice pick, a ski mask, and other items believed to be burglary tools were found in Bundy’s vehicle and he was taken into custody. Bundy was executed in Florida’s electric chair in 1989.

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The Bundy family took possession of the home in 1955. It was a small blue house, built sometime around 1946 (the same year Bundy was born) and was roughly 1400 sq ft. Ted was 9 when the family moved in and, by the time he was sentenced to death, his family was no longer living there. It is said that Bundy’s room was either on the main level of the home or in the basement at the bottom of the stairs.
Haunted House?
According to contractor Casey Clapton, he was hired in October of last year to remodel the house so it could be flipped, the home is indeed haunted by something otherworldly. Clapton’s 11 year old daughter, often charged with the task of recording the repair notes he dictates as he walks a new property, agrees with this assessment. She claims the house “makes her feel weird” and has refused to remain in the house alone. Clapton dismissed her claims until he spoke with a neighbor about the home and found out about the previous owners.
According to Clapton’s employees, tools often unplug themselves and the batteries on personal electronics drain without explanation or warning. Heavy furniture has also tipped over. A built in dresser was pulled out from its niche in the wall and toppled to the floor. The furniture required two workers to move it. “Help Me” was written on a basement window beneath a protective screen that had been placed over the glass. Although it’s not impossible to unscrew the screen, Clapton’s employees saw this as an unexplained phenomena. Clapton says although it’s “not impossible” to remove the screen, it would “make it difficult” for someone to do so. Although a security system is in place on the property, contractors who have locked up the house the night prior have returned in the morning to kitchen drawers and cabinets hanging open while the system remains engaged. The word “Leave” has also been found written in the drywall dust on the floor with no footprints surrounding it.
Although Clapton, his daughter, and his workers are all freaked out by the occurrences at the property, Clapton himself doesn’t see it as a problem. A self professed lover of true crime, Clapton thinks it’s neat to work on the property and, even if it is haunted, says he’ll continue the remodel.

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Did Ted return to his childhood home after his death or is the home haunted by something or someone else? What are your thoughts? Leave us a comment below!
Your Fellow Haunt Head,
Janine
hauntheadscast@gmail.com
Tweet us @hauntheadscast
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Come to the dark side…we have bacon. Haunt Heads S1 Ep.2

Haunt Heads S1 Ep. 2 NOW AVAILABLE‼️
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Also available on: Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play, Blubrry, Pocket Casts, Podcast Addict
 
“Come to the dark side…we have bacon.”
This week, Janine brings you the tales of the *Villisca Axe Murder House in Villisca, Iowa, and a classic piece of Hag folklore from Newfoundland, Canada. This episode features a severely contaminated crime scene, a snarling demon from hell, and bacon (potentially) used for a dark purpose.
 
Hope you enjoy it! Please Like+Share+Subscribe+Review+Follow+ETC  💀
 
*This episode contains graphic descriptions of violence. Listeners, be advised.

Chi Town’s Capone: A Haunted Man

He employed over 1,000 gunmen and half of the police in Chicago were on his payroll. Dozens of city officials were paid off and he controlled elections with threats and terror. That man was Alphonse “Al” Capone. He was perhaps the most powerful crime boss of his day and one of the most recognized men in American history. During prohibition, Capon basically owned the city of Chicago.

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Capone was born in 1899, in Brooklyn, NY. He moved to Chicago in 1920 with his uncle, a mob boss named Big Jim Collisimo and worked for him until he and a fellow mobster had Collisimo killed. By the time Capone was 26, he controlled a crime organization worth over $30 million and had a payroll of over $300,000.

Eventually arrested for tax evasion in 1934, Capone was sentenced to 11 years in Federal Prison in Atlanta, but was eventually transferred to Alcatraz, one of the toughest prisons of the time. Prisoners were severely beaten for the slightest infraction and spent long stretches in solitary confinement, also called The Hole. Capone was arrogant and had a difficult time believing that the rules of the prison applied to him, so he was sent to The Hole several times during his stay, once for bribing a guard and twice for speaking. Each time he emerged, fellow inmates reported that Capone appeared shaken and changed for the worse.

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In Alcatraz, Capone’s life was threatened regularly and he was often attacked by other inmates, receiving beatings and, in one instance, a stabbing. He was granted permission to spend rec time in his cell and, in an effort to give him something to occupy his mind, his wife Mae sent him a banjo. He often sat in his cell and played.

After five years, Capone had snapped. He refused to go to the mess hall to take his meals and was often seen crouched in a corner of his cell rocking and  babbling to himself. He made his bunk several times a day and was said to have entire conversations with something unseen. Capone left Alcatraz in 1939 and retired to his mansion in Miami, FL, reportedly flitting between lucidity and psychosis for the remainder of his life.

Some visitors to Alcatraz have reported hearing banjo music in Capone’s cell, but his ghost is not said to haunt the structure. Rather, Capone himself was a haunted man. Capone had ordered James Clark, the brother in law of Bugs Moran, killed, and asserted that Clark’s ghost haunted him daily. Capone’s body guards reported hearing him begging to be left in peace and, when they broke down the door to his bedroom fearing for his safety, they found Capone alone and shaking.  His employees would often hear him talking to himself and asking to be left alone. Capone had even employed a psychic, Alice Britt, to rid him of the spirit causing him unrest. All of these instances were before Capone was ever imprisoned.

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Was Capone haunted by the ghost of James Clark? Capone ordered the murder of many people during his time as a crime kingpin. Why would only one ghost attach itself to him?

Do you think Capone was actually being haunted by Clarke’s ghost? Have you visited Alcatraz and heard Capone’s banjo music? Let us know in the comments.

Your Fellow Haunt Head,

Janine

hauntheadscast@gmail.com

Tweet us @hauntheadscast

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